Glupsk

Glupsk is a band that makes music, sometimes with instruments, almost always with a computer. Sometimes there are three performers, sometimes more, and sometimes they are not present in the space they are playing in.

Glupsk er hljómsveit sem gerir tónlist stundum með hljóðfæri, eiginlega alltaf með tölvu. Stundum eru þrír hljóðfæraleikarar en líka stundum fleiri og stundum eru flytjendurnir ekki í rýminu sem þeir eru að spila í.

Web Page: https://glupsk.bandcamp.com/

 

Josh Wilkinson and Joseph Burgess

 

NRA is a carpet revolution currently taking place in Brisbane, Australia spearheaded by multi-visionary artist Joseph Burgess/Unregistered Master Building. Footsoilders of the movement include fellow artist Joshua Wilkinson and members of the KEPK art space on the south side of Brisbane.

NRA’s recent work utilises a carpet tufting gun to reflect scenes of unrest in Joseph’s hometown of Portland, Oregon. Portland is has been a pivotal city in the BLM movement since the murder of George Floyd. Each night as police and protestors have clashed on its streets downtown has become reminiscent of a warzone. With monuments set on fire, molotov cocktails, and fireworks illuminating the streets of the city. Boarded-up buildings frame the current tension between armoured federal agents and masked citizens. These events are personal to me as I experienced police brutality there in 2009. My work around this topic aims to re-stage my angst about that experience and the city’s current circumstances by re-interpreting these images in a new way using the mechanical process of the tufting gun.

 
 

I hate fireworks 

 
Audio/Visual Performance 
Tufting Gun, Canvas Frame, Scaffold, Audio,
 Duration 5 minutes   
A tufting gun is both loud and aggressive in its application of yarn onto a canvas surface. It’s designed to quickly produce carpet. This project disregards its traditional use-value to instead utilise it as a symbolic tool to render images of unrest in Portland in a very potent and disarming way. The performance involves a live carpeting viewed from 360 degrees and consists of a projector projecting an image onto a canvas surface placed on a scaffold structure. From behind the scaffold I retrace the image using the tufting gun.
My tufting gun is fitted with piezos (ceramic disk that translate surface pressure to voltage) that triggers amplified audio samples. The samples include field recordings from Portland protests collected by friends on the front line and sound bites from mainstream media. (see support material video). These samples are selectively triggered by each pulse of the carpet gun creating a pulsing cacophony of sound to accompany the ‘appearance’ of a ‘protest’ image in carpet.
As mentioned, the current circumstances in Portland are troubling for me. This project, in particular its performance, aims to not only restage images of the social unrest but to reconcile the tensions that exist within and in society at large. The re-representation of images in carpet has the curious potential to ‘soften’ their impact while remaining significantly potent and disconcerting (through its very ‘gun-like’ nature) to infer/reinforce the already existing tensions that are present not only in the USA but in many parts of the world.

 

Thor Magnusson & Eiríkur Orri Ólafsson performance

Thor Magnússon

 

Eiríkur Orri Ólafsson

 

Thor MAGNUSSON and Eiríkur Orri:

Threnoscope and Trumpet

Fermata is a piece for a microtonal drone instrument called Threnoscope and an acoustic instrument. It is a framework for improvisation of microtonal music, where both the live coder and the instrumentalist contribute equally to the piece’s development. The Threnoscope is notated through live coding, with sounds being represented on a graphical score next to the coding terminal. Its visual appearance illustrates the harmonics of a fundamental tone, as well as speaker locations. Musical notes move around the spectral and physical space, long in duration, and sculptable by the performer. Fermata has been performed with Adriana Sá (London), Miguel Mira (Lisbon), Iñigo Ibaibarriaga (Bilbao), Áki Ásgeirsson (Reykjavik), Alexander Refsum Jensenius (Oslo), Peter Furniss (Edinburgh), Helen Papaioannou (Sheffield), and Peter Herbert/Hannes Löschel (Linz) and Tommi Keränen (Helsinki). This time Eiríkur Orri will join the piece on trumpet.

 

Biographies

Thor Magnusson is a Professor in Future Music at the University of Sussex. His work focusses on the impact digital technologies have on musical creativity and practice, explored equally through practice (software development, composition and performance) and theory (academic publications, lecturing, talks) . He is the co-founder of ixi audio (www.ixi-audio.net), and has developed audio software, systems of generative music composition, written computer music tutorials and created two musical live coding environments. He has taught workshops in creative music coding and sound installations, and given presentations, performances and visiting lectures at diverse art institutions, conservatories, and universities internationally.

In 2019, Bloomsbury Academic published Magnusson’s monograph Sonic Writing: The Technologies of Material, Symbolic and Signal Inscriptions. The book explores how contemporary music technologies trace their ancestry to previous forms of instruments and media, including symbolic musical notation. The book underpins his research in creative AI, where, as part of the MIMIC project (www.mimicproject.com), Magnusson has worked on a system that enables users to design their own live coding languages for machine learning.

Further information here: http://thormagnusson.github.io

 

Eiríkur Orri Ólafsson is a frequent collaborator with some of Iceland’s most innovative artists, Eiríkur has been a fixture on the alternative and experimental music scene since the late nineties. He spent nine years touring and recording with múm and has collaborat- ed with Sigur Rós as a brass player and also a musical director for their 2012-2013 Valtari and Kveikur tour. Eiríkur has a background as a jazz musician, which leads to him being a sought after improviser in Reykjavík, performing with Skúli Sverrisson, Hilmar Jensson, the Reykjavik Big Band and others. His trio, Hist Og, released its debut album, “Days of Tundra” in 2019. It was well received, including three nomi- nations to the Icelandic Music Awards. His musical approach varies from abrasive and disembodied noise to medita- tive sound weaving, often incorporating electronics. As an arranger, he as arranged strings and brass for Sigur Rós, múm, Sin Fang, Kira Kira and others.

https://eirikurorri.com

Thor Magnusson lecture

 

Sonic Writing: Technologies of Material, Symbolic and Signal Inscriptions

In this lecture I present resent research that explores how contemporary music technologies trace their ancestry to previous forms of instruments and media. I will look at how new digital music technologies trace their origins in traditional instrument design, musical notation, and sound recording. The scope will range from ancient Greek music theory, medieval notation, early modern scientific instrumentation to contemporary multimedia and artificial intelligence.

I will point to a bespoke affinity and similarity between current musical practices and those from before the advent of notation and recording, stressing the importance of instrument design in the study of new music and projecting how new computational technologies, including machine learning, will transform our musical practices.

Buy the book [35% discount code: GLR MP6]

 

Biography

Thor Magnusson is a Professor in Future Music at the University of Sussex. His work focusses on the impact digital technologies have on musical creativity and practice, explored equally through practice (software development, composition and performance) and theory (academic publications, lecturing, talks) . He is the co-founder of ixi audio (www.ixi-audio.net), and has developed audio software, systems of generative music composition, written computer music tutorials and created two musical live coding environments. He has taught workshops in creative music coding and sound installations, and given presentations, performances and visiting lectures at diverse art institutions, conservatories, and universities internationally.

In 2019, Bloomsbury Academic published Magnusson’s monograph Sonic Writing: The Technologies of Material, Symbolic and Signal Inscriptions. The book explores how contemporary music technologies trace their ancestry to previous forms of instruments and media, including symbolic musical notation. The book underpins his research in creative AI, where, as part of the MIMIC project (www.mimicproject.com), Magnusson has worked on a system that enables users to design their own live coding languages for machine learning.

Further information here: http://thormagnusson.github.io

Okuma

Okuma

Okuma is a duo based in Reykjavik, Iceland. They like to describe their music as post-apocalyptic, sourcing inspiration in reflections about our times.
Saxophone and electric guitar are interfaced with modular synthesizers and computers, fed through real-time processing units. A highly interactive setup providing a very open and intuitive playground. Okuma is constantly exploring ways to unify these elements into a world of sound that leaves room for improvisation – complex harmonies and organic textures, raw electronics, subtle melodies and unexpected rhythms.

Okuma (Tómas Manoury & Daníel Friðrik) er dúó starfrækt í Reykjavík. Þeir skilgreina tónlist sína sem heimsendatónlist – staða mannsins í nútímanum er þeim hugleikin og uppspretta hugmynda. Þeir nota gagnvirkan búnað til þess að tengja saxófón og rafgítar við módúlar-syntha og tölvur fyrir rauntímahljóðvinnslu. Okuma rannsakar ólíka tengimöguleika til þess að skapa hljóðheim sem er opinn og flæðandi en virkar einnig sem rammi fyrir spuna. Akústík mætir elektróník á lífrænum leikvelli þar sem allt getur gerst.